US Homefront WW2 Unit - Short Story, Walking Home Illustration

Walking Home -
Story, WWII

 
 

One day in February 1943, I was walking home from the theatre. The price had gone up to 15 cents. It was probably that way all over. Everything was expensive. It was worth it to get news of the war. The newsreels helped us to understand what was going on overseas.

My brother and my father were both overseas in Europe, fighting the Germans. I felt badly buying an ice cream soda for myself when they were off fighting, but if you didn't use your ration stamps, well, they were just wasted. Nothing was wasted anymore. Just last weekend I had been part of a drive going door to door to collect trash metal. They made bullets out of metal, and bullets were needed.

I tried not to look at Mrs. Gingsey's house as I walked home. I knew what I would see - a gold star in her window. We read in the paper that her son had died in the war. I knew her son. He was much older than me, but such a nice boy. He always had time for a wave or a smile. I looked the other way instead at the poster in Mr. Arnold's grocery window. He had put that poster in his window over a year ago. It said: "Loose lips might sink ships".



It was posted right next to his ration stamp sign - the one that announced what ration stamps could be used that week. Then came his two blue stars. The stars meant he had two boys fighting in Europe.

Today, Mr. Arnold had posted a third sign. It was a poster with enemy aircraft on it to help us identify the enemy should they fly over. I went over to take a better look. It was important that everyone stay alert. That's when I noticed. Like always, Mr. Arnold had two big stars posted in his window. Only today, one was a blue star and one was a gold star. One of his boys must have died. I burst into tears.

Mr. Arnold looked at me through his window. His face was so sad. When will this war be over? When will this war be over?

Questions:


  1. Who is writing this story?

  2. What clues lead you to your answer?


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Short Story: Walking Home by Lin Donn